Oz Wonderland Trilogy

Scripts by E. Nelson Bridwell, Joey Cavalieri, and Carol Lay. Art and cover by Carol Lay.

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Escape

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Electric Soup

Electric Soup is the title of a Scottish underground comic book series which was first published in 1989, and ran until 1992.

The title was an anthology title with its most notable strip being The Greens, (a parody of The Broons strip published by D.C Thomson) which was written and drawn by Frank Quitely. Other stories were written and drawn by Shug, Dave Alexander, (whose creations The MacBam brothers proved a popular feature) Tommy Somme, Gerbil and others.

Electric Soup was independently published and distributed round the Glasgow area to start with, but it received distribution though comic books shops before being snapped up by John Brown Publishing for UK distribution.

The humour was very Glaswegian in its strips, very akin to how Viz is full of geordie humour in many of its comic strips. The title was moderately successful but it was eventually cancelled after 17 issues. The MacBams storyline was continued in their own title, which lasted for one issue. A one-off Electric Soup 10th anniversary 18th edition was published in 1999, reuniting all of the original contributors. The last Greens strip from this one off special was later reprinted in colour in Northern Lightz, another Scottish underground comic book, which carried further adventures of Alexanders MacBams and Shug’s Wildebeest characters. Shug now known as Shug 90 now has his” Electric soup” characters”Rex and Tom/Polis Story and The Wildebeests” published in small press publication Khaki Shorts by Rob Miller.

3,10,13



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16

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17

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Damage

Publisher: Galaxy Publications
Publication Dates: 1991 ? – ?
Number of Issues Published: 17 (#v2#1 – #[nn])
Color: Colour
Dimensions: Magazine-size
Binding: Saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Was ongoing
Publication Type: magazine

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Spring Annual 1990

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The great big 1990 Annual Xmas Annual

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v1 12,13, v2 1

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v2 2-4

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v2 5-7

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v2 8-10

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v2 11,12, v3 1

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v3 2-4

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Curse of the Weird

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v1 1-4




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Brain Damage

Brain Damage was a British adult comic that was published monthly by Galaxy Publications (later Tristar Publications) and edited by Bill Hampton from 1989 to 1992.

Brain Damage was one of many comics trying to emulate the success of Viz; however whereas most of its peers were crude, low-quality Viz imitations, Brain Damage attempted to capture the high end of the market, with contributions from recognised cartoonists and satirists, and a strong leaning towards UK politics. In this way, it seemed to aspire to be a more modern Oz. Many issues contained a central theme around which strips were supposed to focus. Each cover featured an unnamed mascot which vaguely resembled the 1980s children’s TV puppet Gilbert the Alien.

Its sibling titles included the direct Viz clone Gas and reprint anthology Talking Turkey.

Brain Damage was published until volume 3, number 4 (issue 28), and was then replaced with Elephant Parts which abandoned the political aspects in favour of surreal nonsense. Elephant Parts supposedly incorporated “The Damage”, but as it was printed on different paper stock and with a markedly changed editorial, was effectively a different magazine. Elephant Parts was printed for a few months.

On 18 June 2009, all rights to the Brain Damage comic series were acquired by Untitled Project Productions in Brooklyn, NY. The intent was to produce a series of half-hour animated TV shows.

Regular strips included:

Andy The Anarchist by Anthony Smith – a stereotypical anarchist.
Arseover Tit by Hunt Emerson – a two-headed creature called Alf (as in “half and half”) and his adventures in society. Usually Alf would get mangled after failing to decide which way to jump from an oncoming attack due to having two heads.
Cameraman by Stevie Best – a day-to-day story of a cynical paparazzo (tabloid photographer).
Hell’s Rotarians by unknown – setting septuagenarian Rotarians as Hells Angels
Home Front by John Erasmus – a strip involving a mother and son, the mother being a cheerful psychopath who caused carnage each issue, embarrassing her son.
Rymeword Scrubs by Doug Cameron and Ben Norris – a prison to house cartoon characters with rhyming names (e.g. David Fottom, with a talking bottom).
The Striker Wore Pink Knickers by Tony Husband and Ron Tiner- a pastiche of Roy of the Rovers type strips about a girl playing professional football posing as a man. The strip ended with all the main characters realizing they were homosexual and being murdered by a skinhead.
The Watchdogs by Tony Reeve – two cartoon dogs, based on Douglas Hurd, the then Foreign Secretary, and Mary Whitehouse, the Christian morality campaigner.
Sam Shovel by Kev F. Sutherland – a pun-filled detective parody in the style of Jim Steranko’s early graphic novel Chandler.
Watch With Mutha by Doug Cameron and Ben Norris – one-off strips poking fun at children’s television, with adult themes.
We Ran The World by Andy Oldfield and Mike Roberts – a lavish colour strip containing analysis of British culture and history from a left-wing (and often Marxist) perspective. Two recurring characters were a teenage skinhead indoctrinated by tabloid newspapers and his world-wise grandfather (who had fought against Oswald Mosley).
Wildtrouser Hall by Cluff – about an aristocratic family who were psychopathic Nazi parasites.
The Andy Oldfield Column – political rants accompanied by satirical cartoons by Clive Wakfer.
Edith Appleby: O.A.P. Warrior by David Leach – a little old lady in a nursing home becomes a vigilante after the murder of a number of her friends at the hands of the home’s corrupt staff. Written as a series, only two episodes were published before the magazine’s closure.
Diary of a Mad Housewife by Neil Nixon/ Stanley Manly – the surreal rantings of a married woman, written as a diary entry, which appeared regularly in Elephant Parts. Nixon wrote prose pieces and items for all the Galaxy adult humour titles, including some repeating ideas, but this was his only regular strip.
Tim Tim a parody of Herge’s TinTin, in this case Herpes

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v1 8-11




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Panic

Panic was part of the EC Comics line during the mid-1950s. The bi-monthly humor comic was published by Bill Gaines as a companion to Harvey Kurtzman’s Mad, which was being heavily imitated by other comic publishers.

Panic was edited by Al Feldstein (who became the editor of Mad a few years later). Beginning with its first issue (February–March 1954), Panic had a 12-issue run over two years. Feldstein was the primary cover artist, with stories illustrated by Jack Davis, Will Elder, Jack Kamen, Joe Orlando, Basil Wolverton and Wally Wood. Some story ideas were by Nick Meglin, later the co-editor of Mad. Scripts were by Feldstein, Elder and Jack Mendelsohn, later a co-screenwriter of Yellow Submarine (1968) and an Emmy-nominated TV comedy writer.

EC dubbed Panic the “only authorized imitation” of Mad, but Mad’s creator didn’t enjoy the joke. Almost thirty years later, Harvey Kurtzman told an interviewer, “Panic was another sore point. Gaines, by some convoluted reasoning, decided to double the profit of Mad by doing a Feldstein version of Mad and he just plundered all of my techniques and artists. For this there was a real conflict of interests.”

The publication was immediately controversial, as detailed by Steve Stiles in his article,”It’s a Panic!”:
What Panic also earned was a storm of indignation that burst over Gaines’ head with the very first issue, and all over the holiday of “Peace on Earth, Good Will Towards Men”. It’s strange that Gaines didn’t see it coming, but some people got very annoyed with a satire of “The Night Before Christmas”. To put it mildly.
Gaines later recalled, “The trouble we had on the Santa Claus story was Bill Elder. He had put a sign on the sleigh of Santa Claus, ‘Just Divorced’. Now how do a bunch of iconoclastic, atheist bastards like us know that Santa Claus is a saint and that he can’t be divorced and that this is going to offend Boston?” This didn’t stop Gaines from later dressing in a Santa suit and posing for a Mad subscription offer as a benevolent gift giver (because the subscription rate was only a few cents cheaper than buying the issues at cover price).

As a result of the parody, Panic was ultimately banned from sale in the state of Massachusetts. Gaines puckishly responded by issuing a press release announcing that as a “retaliatory measure,” EC was pulling all copies of its Picture Stories from the Bible comic book out of Massachusetts. It took the newspapers a few days to realize that the discontinued comic hadn’t been on sale in Massachusetts, or anywhere else, in five years.

More legal hassles came EC’s way because of another story from the first issue, a gory parody of Mickey Spillane’s My Gun is the Jury that ended with one of Spillane’s bombshell women revealed as a transvestite. A few days after the Santa controversy in Massachusetts, EC’s offices were raided by the New York City police. Gaines’ associate Lyle Stuart willingly took responsibility and was arrested; the charge was quickly thrown out of court. In the meantime, abrasive gossip columnist Walter Winchell reported the story without mentioning that Stuart was released without result, and added, “Attention all newsstands! Anyone selling the filth of Lyle Stuart will be subject to the same arrest!” Winchell may have been motivated by “The Secret Life of Walter Winchell”, a negative book based on a series of negative magazine articles about him written by Stuart, but his rhetoric cost him $21,500 after Stuart sued for libel. Stuart used the money to start his own publishing house.

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8-12





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National Lampoon

Not really Comix bit it’s sort of Underground and has a section with alternative comics also.

National Lampoon was an American humor magazine which ran from 1970 to 1998. The magazine started out as a spinoff from the Harvard Lampoon. National Lampoon magazine reached its height of popularity and critical acclaim during the late 1970s, when it had a far-reaching effect on American humor and comedy. The magazine spawned films, radio, live theatre, various sound recordings, and print products including books. Many members of the creative staff from the magazine subsequently went on to contribute creatively to successful media of all types.

During the magazine’s most successful years, parody of every kind was a mainstay; surrealist content was also central to its appeal. Almost all the issues included long text pieces, shorter written pieces, a section of actual news items (dubbed “True Facts”), cartoons and comic strips. Most issues also included “Foto Funnies” or fumetti, which often featured nudity. The result was an unusual mix of intelligent, cutting-edge wit, combined with some crass, bawdy jesting. In both cases, National Lampoon humor often pushed far beyond the boundaries of what was generally considered appropriate and acceptable. As co-founder Henry Beard described the experience years later: “There was this big door that said, ‘Thou shalt not.’ We touched it, and it fell off its hinges.”

The magazine declined during the late 1980s and never recovered. It was kept alive minimally, but ceased publication altogether in 1998.

Very Large Book Of Comical Funnies

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9x 1970

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12x 1971

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12x 1972

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12x 1973

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12x 1974

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12x 1975

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12x 1976

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12x 1977

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6x 1978

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6x 1978

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6x 1979

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6x 1979

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6x 1980

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6x 1980

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6x 1981

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6x 1981

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9x 1982

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6x 1983

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5x 1983

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6x 1984

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5x 1984

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6x 1985

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6x 1985

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6x 1986

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5x 1986

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6x 1987

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6x 1988

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6x 1989

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6x 1990

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7x 1991

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2x 1992 5x 1994

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Get Lost

Get Lost was quite unique when it was released. During the time of all of the Mad comic book imitations, all were produced by the major comic book companies of the time. For instance, Harvey had Flip, Atlas had Crazy, Charlton had Eh!

Get Lost was produced by Ross Andru and Mike Esposito for their own Mikeross Publications. The humor and style was so similar to Mad that E.C. made mention of it on the cover of E.C.’s Panic #4, where it was referred to as “Get Stung”! Now Comics later reprinted these original issues in black and white some 30 years after.

Get Lost 1,3 Get Lost Compilation (Thanks to Mulo Kibizer)



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Bill Graham Presents In New York Fillmore East

It’s not really Comix offcourse, but for sure Underground to me.

Bill Graham (1931–1991). Recognized as one of the most influential concert promoters in history, Graham launched the careers of countless rock & roll legends in the ’60s at his famed Fillmore Auditorium. He conceived of rock & roll as a powerful force for supporting humanitarian causes and was instrumental in the production of milestone benefit concerts such as Live Aid (1985) and Human Rights Now! (1988). As a promoter and manager, he worked with the biggest names in rock, including the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix, Santana, Led Zeppelin, and the Rolling Stones.

Born in Berlin, Graham emigrated to New York at the age of eleven as part of a Red Cross effort to help Jewish children fleeing the Nazis. He went to live with a foster family in the Bronx and spent his teenage years in New York City, selling baseball cards, playing craps in the schoolyard, and working as a delivery boy before being drafted into the Army to fight in the Korean War. He relocated to San Francisco just as the hippie movement was gathering steam, and became the business manager for the San Francisco Mime Troupe, a radical theater company that performed for free in parks. The first show Graham presented was on November 6, 1965: a fundraiser to support the legal defense of one of the Mime Troupe actors. It was a transformative moment for the thirty-four-year-old, who’d finally found something he was good at by which he could also earn a living. Soon afterwards he took over the lease on the famed Fillmore Auditorium, where he produced groundbreaking shows throughout the ’60s, including sold-out
concerts by the Grateful Dead, Cream, Big Brother and the Holding Company, and the Doors. Graham’s mastery at promoting, marketing, and managing artists propelled him to become one of rock & roll’s most influential figures.

12 issues 1968-1971




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