Panic

Panic was part of the EC Comics line during the mid-1950s. The bi-monthly humor comic was published by Bill Gaines as a companion to Harvey Kurtzman’s Mad, which was being heavily imitated by other comic publishers.

Panic was edited by Al Feldstein (who became the editor of Mad a few years later). Beginning with its first issue (February–March 1954), Panic had a 12-issue run over two years. Feldstein was the primary cover artist, with stories illustrated by Jack Davis, Will Elder, Jack Kamen, Joe Orlando, Basil Wolverton and Wally Wood. Some story ideas were by Nick Meglin, later the co-editor of Mad. Scripts were by Feldstein, Elder and Jack Mendelsohn, later a co-screenwriter of Yellow Submarine (1968) and an Emmy-nominated TV comedy writer.

EC dubbed Panic the “only authorized imitation” of Mad, but Mad’s creator didn’t enjoy the joke. Almost thirty years later, Harvey Kurtzman told an interviewer, “Panic was another sore point. Gaines, by some convoluted reasoning, decided to double the profit of Mad by doing a Feldstein version of Mad and he just plundered all of my techniques and artists. For this there was a real conflict of interests.”

The publication was immediately controversial, as detailed by Steve Stiles in his article,”It’s a Panic!”:
What Panic also earned was a storm of indignation that burst over Gaines’ head with the very first issue, and all over the holiday of “Peace on Earth, Good Will Towards Men”. It’s strange that Gaines didn’t see it coming, but some people got very annoyed with a satire of “The Night Before Christmas”. To put it mildly.
Gaines later recalled, “The trouble we had on the Santa Claus story was Bill Elder. He had put a sign on the sleigh of Santa Claus, ‘Just Divorced’. Now how do a bunch of iconoclastic, atheist bastards like us know that Santa Claus is a saint and that he can’t be divorced and that this is going to offend Boston?” This didn’t stop Gaines from later dressing in a Santa suit and posing for a Mad subscription offer as a benevolent gift giver (because the subscription rate was only a few cents cheaper than buying the issues at cover price).

As a result of the parody, Panic was ultimately banned from sale in the state of Massachusetts. Gaines puckishly responded by issuing a press release announcing that as a “retaliatory measure,” EC was pulling all copies of its Picture Stories from the Bible comic book out of Massachusetts. It took the newspapers a few days to realize that the discontinued comic hadn’t been on sale in Massachusetts, or anywhere else, in five years.

More legal hassles came EC’s way because of another story from the first issue, a gory parody of Mickey Spillane’s My Gun is the Jury that ended with one of Spillane’s bombshell women revealed as a transvestite. A few days after the Santa controversy in Massachusetts, EC’s offices were raided by the New York City police. Gaines’ associate Lyle Stuart willingly took responsibility and was arrested; the charge was quickly thrown out of court. In the meantime, abrasive gossip columnist Walter Winchell reported the story without mentioning that Stuart was released without result, and added, “Attention all newsstands! Anyone selling the filth of Lyle Stuart will be subject to the same arrest!” Winchell may have been motivated by “The Secret Life of Walter Winchell”, a negative book based on a series of negative magazine articles about him written by Stuart, but his rhetoric cost him $21,500 after Stuart sued for libel. Stuart used the money to start his own publishing house.

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National Lampoon

Not really Comix bit it’s sort of Underground and has a section with alternative comics also.

National Lampoon was an American humor magazine which ran from 1970 to 1998. The magazine started out as a spinoff from the Harvard Lampoon. National Lampoon magazine reached its height of popularity and critical acclaim during the late 1970s, when it had a far-reaching effect on American humor and comedy. The magazine spawned films, radio, live theatre, various sound recordings, and print products including books. Many members of the creative staff from the magazine subsequently went on to contribute creatively to successful media of all types.

During the magazine’s most successful years, parody of every kind was a mainstay; surrealist content was also central to its appeal. Almost all the issues included long text pieces, shorter written pieces, a section of actual news items (dubbed “True Facts”), cartoons and comic strips. Most issues also included “Foto Funnies” or fumetti, which often featured nudity. The result was an unusual mix of intelligent, cutting-edge wit, combined with some crass, bawdy jesting. In both cases, National Lampoon humor often pushed far beyond the boundaries of what was generally considered appropriate and acceptable. As co-founder Henry Beard described the experience years later: “There was this big door that said, ‘Thou shalt not.’ We touched it, and it fell off its hinges.”

The magazine declined during the late 1980s and never recovered. It was kept alive minimally, but ceased publication altogether in 1998.

Very Large Book Of Comical Funnies

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9x 1970

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12x 1971

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12x 1972

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12x 1973

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12x 1974

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12x 1975

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12x 1976

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12x 1977

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6x 1978

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6x 1978

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6x 1979

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6x 1979

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6x 1980

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6x 1980

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6x 1981

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6x 1981

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9x 1982

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6x 1983

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5x 1983

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6x 1984

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5x 1984

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6x 1985

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6x 1985

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6x 1986

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5x 1986

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6x 1987

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6x 1988

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6x 1989

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6x 1990

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7x 1991

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2x 1992 5x 1994

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Get Lost

Get Lost was quite unique when it was released. During the time of all of the Mad comic book imitations, all were produced by the major comic book companies of the time. For instance, Harvey had Flip, Atlas had Crazy, Charlton had Eh!

Get Lost was produced by Ross Andru and Mike Esposito for their own Mikeross Publications. The humor and style was so similar to Mad that E.C. made mention of it on the cover of E.C.’s Panic #4, where it was referred to as “Get Stung”! Now Comics later reprinted these original issues in black and white some 30 years after.

Get Lost 1,3 Get Lost Compilation (Thanks to Mulo Kibizer)



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Bill Graham Presents In New York Fillmore East

It’s not really Comix offcourse, but for sure Underground to me.

Bill Graham (1931–1991). Recognized as one of the most influential concert promoters in history, Graham launched the careers of countless rock & roll legends in the ’60s at his famed Fillmore Auditorium. He conceived of rock & roll as a powerful force for supporting humanitarian causes and was instrumental in the production of milestone benefit concerts such as Live Aid (1985) and Human Rights Now! (1988). As a promoter and manager, he worked with the biggest names in rock, including the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix, Santana, Led Zeppelin, and the Rolling Stones.

Born in Berlin, Graham emigrated to New York at the age of eleven as part of a Red Cross effort to help Jewish children fleeing the Nazis. He went to live with a foster family in the Bronx and spent his teenage years in New York City, selling baseball cards, playing craps in the schoolyard, and working as a delivery boy before being drafted into the Army to fight in the Korean War. He relocated to San Francisco just as the hippie movement was gathering steam, and became the business manager for the San Francisco Mime Troupe, a radical theater company that performed for free in parks. The first show Graham presented was on November 6, 1965: a fundraiser to support the legal defense of one of the Mime Troupe actors. It was a transformative moment for the thirty-four-year-old, who’d finally found something he was good at by which he could also earn a living. Soon afterwards he took over the lease on the famed Fillmore Auditorium, where he produced groundbreaking shows throughout the ’60s, including sold-out
concerts by the Grateful Dead, Cream, Big Brother and the Holding Company, and the Doors. Graham’s mastery at promoting, marketing, and managing artists propelled him to become one of rock & roll’s most influential figures.

12 issues 1968-1971




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Swift Sure

Publisher: Harrier
Publication Dates: May 1985 – January 1986
Number of Issues Published: 6 (#1 – #6)
Dimensions: Standard Modern Age U.S.
Binding: Saddle-Stitched
Publication Type: magazine

And Conqueror

Publisher: Harrier
Publication Dates: March 1986 – May 1987
Number of Issues Published: 8 (#7 – #14)
Color: Colour Cover; Black & White Interior
Dimensions: Standard Modern Age U.S.
Paper Stock: Glossy Cover; Matte Interior
Publication Type: magazine

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

3,9, and Conqueror 7



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Shock Therapy

Publisher: Harrier
Publication Dates: December 1986 – August 1987
Number of Issues Published: 6 (#1 – #6)
Color: Colour Cover; Black & White Interior
Dimensions: Standard Modern Age U.S.
Paper Stock: Glossy Cover; Matte Interior

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

1,3,4,5




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Second City

Publisher: Harrier
Publication Dates: November 1986 – April 1987
Number of Issues Published: 4 (#1 – #4)
Color: Color cover; black & white interior
Dimensions: Standard Modern Age U. S.
Binding: Saddle-stitched

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

1-4




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Saviour

Publisher: Trident
Publication Dates: December 1989 – January 1991
Number of Issues Published: 6 (#1 – #6)
Color: Colour Cover; Black & White Interior
Dimensions: Standard Modern Age U.S.
Paper Stock: Glossy Cover; Newsprint Interior
Binding: Saddle-Stitched

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

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tpb 1990

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Redfox

Publisher: Harrier
Publication Dates: January 1986 – July 1987
Number of Issues Published: 10 (#1 – #10)
Color: Colour Cover; Black & White Interior
Dimensions: Standard Modern Age U.S.
Binding: Saddle-Stitched
Publication Type: magazine

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

v1 1,3,4,9




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Marvel Madhouse

Publisher: Marvel UK
Publication Dates: 1981 – 1982
Number of Issues Published: 17 (#1 – #17)
Color: Colour cover with black and white interior
Dimensions: Magazine size
Paper Stock: Newsprint
Binding: Saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Was Ongoing Series

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

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